Pete Francisco’s Whitefish Real Estate March Newsletter

Pete-for-web

Pete​ ​has​ ​lived​ ​in​ ​the​ ​Flathead​ ​Valley​ ​for​ ​over​ ​17​ ​years.​ ​​ ​After​ ​living​ ​in​ ​Colorado​ ​and​ ​Utah,​ ​his​ ​passion​ ​for​ ​the​ ​outdoors finally​ ​drew​ ​him​ ​to​ ​Montana.​ ​It​ ​didn’t​ ​take​ ​him​ ​long​ ​to​ ​realize​ ​this​ ​was​ ​a​ ​special​ ​place,​ ​and​ ​he​ ​settled​ ​down​ ​to​ ​make​ ​this​ ​area his​ ​home.​ ​Years​ ​of​ ​experience​ ​in​ ​the​ ​service​ ​industry​ ​has​ ​given​ ​Pete​ ​the​ ​ability​ ​to​ ​work​ ​well​ ​with​ ​clients​ ​and​ ​connect​ ​with people​ ​quickly.​ ​An​ ​avid​ ​skier,​ ​mountain​ ​biker,​ ​and​ ​fly​ ​fisherman,​ ​Pete’s​ ​enthusiasm​ ​for​ ​outdoor​ ​recreating​ ​has​ ​taken​ ​him​ ​all over​ ​the​ ​valley​ ​and​ ​has​ ​given​ ​him​ ​a​ ​unique​ ​and​ ​expert​ ​knowledge​ ​of​ ​the​ ​area.​ ​Whatever​ ​your​ ​passion​ ​is,​ ​Pete​ ​would​ ​love​ ​to show​ ​you​ ​what​ ​makes​ ​this​ ​area​ ​special​ ​and​ ​help​ ​you​ ​find​ ​your​ ​piece​ ​of​ ​it. To contact Pete call: 406.270.5908.

Powder skier

A Powder-Full Winter

Photo by Greg Lindstrom, story by Tristan Scott, Flathead Beacon.

Powder hounds whose snow-sensors have been twitching lately are probably channeling last winter’s bodacious bounty, which delivered 9 1/2 feet of white gold on Big Mountain in February alone, followed by another walloping of 8 1/2 feet in March, rounding out the most epic winter in recent memory.

Or maybe that tingling feeling is reminiscent of the 2007-2008 season, when a record 426 inches of powder (35 feet) graced Big Mountain during a season that saw the resort’s name officially change to Whitefish Mountain Resort, a move that rankled some locals who simply cooled their heels in the deep snowpack and groused to their friends between face shots.

Whatever’s giving you the powder fever, it’s working, with this winter stepping up to consistently deliver the goods.

As of Feb. 12, Whitefish Mountain Resort’s 125-inch settle base ranked the mountain third for the deepest snow among all ski areas in the nation, as well as the deepest in the Rocky Mountains and seventh-deepest in North America.

More than 21 feet of powder has fallen on the slopes since Nov. 1 — compared to more than 25 feet by this time a decade ago — and a recent streak of 22 days of snowfall deposited more than 100 inches on Big Mountain, according to Riley Polumbus, Whitefish Mountain Resort’s public relations manager.

“We’re on a good streak,” Polumbus said, noting that Big Mountain has already accumulated 84 percent of its 10-year average of 305 inches. “We have one of the best snowpacks that we’ve had here in a while, historically speaking.”

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Featured Property: 1243 Timber Ridge, lot 22, Columbia Falls

Whitefish Trail Users Spend $6.1 Million Locally Every Year

BY TRISTAN SCOTT // DEC 12, 2017, FLATHEAD BEACON. PHOTO BY STEVE GNAM.

A yearlong study to quantify outdoor recreation reveals that playing outside is a major boon to the local economy, with Whitefish Trail users contributing $6.1 million annually.

Relying on intercept surveys, infrared counters, manual verification, Strava accounts, and statewide tourism data, Whitefish Legacy Partners and the Whitefish Convention and Visitors Bureau partnered with Headwaters Economics to better understand the economic ripple effects of outdoor recreation.

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Training Ground

EPISODE TEN: OPEN ROAD

Billy O’Donnell, founder of RIDGE Mountain Academy, strives to inspire others to live life to their fullest potential. See how his students embrace it and you can too.

The Untrammeled Observatory: Lessons from Wilderness Fire

March 7, 2018 Flathead Valley Community College
7:00 PM Free Admission
Speaker Andrew J. Larson, Associate Professor of Forest Ecology, Department of Forest Management, University of Montana, will present results of several years of fire and forest ecology field research in the Bob Marshall Wilderness. Topics include the scientific and educational value of wilderness, the fire ecology of the Northern Rocky forests, and the importance of wilderness areas as a source of information to help society sustainably manage non-wilderness lands.
Click here for more details…